Friday, June 16, 2017

Digging yacon and Chinese artichokes

We are having some great, sunny days lately so I have been getting out to do a heap of weeding and tidying up for winter. The last of the tuberous crops to go up to Qld with me have been dug so I am ready to go, well, as soon as I clean up my van and put the seed in. Must get on to that today.

This will be my last post for a couple of weeks as I will be on the road and I probably won't be on the internet much.

 Yesterday I dug up the Chinese artichokes. I only had a few plants in after losing most of them last year due to bad management. I had them growing in a bed where I hadn't got rid of the crab grass properly. By the time the artichokes started growing the crab grass was well up and growing strongly so I couldn't get rid of it. The artichokes really don't compete well with running grasses.

Even with the few plants I had and not watering them well last summer they did produce good sized tubers. This is not a good producing crop but it is fun.
You can put the tubers in salads and stir fries for a bit of crunch, and they look amazing.








I also got into digging up the yacon. The eating tubers were great this year, and quite big, though I was a bit disappointed with the small amount of growing sets that were produced. At least I had enough to replant and to fill the order I have for them.

I will let the tubers sweeten and take them to the markets next month.





The tubers were quite crowded and I think this was because the soil amendments like lime and fertiliser have not yet sunk down low into the soil so the roots have stayed around the top of the soil rather then going down.

This will remedy itself over time as rain washes the good stuff deeper into the soil but I will have to keep an eye on it. The roots really don't like the severe natural acidity of my soil. I have also noticed this in some of my other vegetables.

As the soil gets improved deeper I will get better results every year.

















Saturday, June 10, 2017

Digging the Arracacha

With only a week to go till I leave on my trip up north I have started digging some of my tuberous vegetables to take. I have beds of yacon, arracacha, mauka and arrowroot to get through, clean and pack for the trip. Due to the wet at the end of last year most of the plants rotted and died so I don't have near as many as I would have liked.

 A couple of posts ago I told you about a couple of aracacha plants that I dug up to divide for replanting. They had heaps of top growth and no roots.

Well the one I dug up today only had a few small roots but at least it was enough for a meal. I had forgotten how tasty they are, like thick, sticky potato with a flavour I can't really describe and also a bit sweet. I will leave a couple of plants in the ground for another year to see what the roots do.

The roots must be cooked (I boil mine) as they are too hard to eat when raw.

The plants grew bigger this year than they ever have done before. It is probably the soil but I will have to work on the optimal conditions for not only top growth, but also root formation.

The leaves are a bit too stringy to eat though they are not poisonous.

This is a pic from last year but I decided to show it again because I forgot to go out and take some photos today.

This is how the main part of the plant grows, the roots have been pulled off at this stage.
The main stem produces smaller stems which you can cut or break off and replant.
Before planting you need to cut the bottoms of the cuttings a few times to encourage more roots to form.

Although you can dig the plant every winter if your season is long enough, you should try to leave the plants in the ground for two years for bigger roots. The plants will die down a bit to a lot over winter depending how cold it gets but will bounce back in spring.







Sunday, June 4, 2017

Selecting white beetroot for seed, and frosty mornings

The frosts were late this year but they are making up for it now. We have had some fairly severe frosts the last few mornings which has finished the yacon and capsicums.


 This is what the yacon looks like now. I will be digging the tubers next week ready for sale. I really like yacon but I grow too much to eat all the tubers. I am really disappointed that I can't get people to buy them, or even take them for free.
Oh well, just like the melons, pumpkins and capsicums I will be throwing out a lot of good food.
 I have just mowed another acre, well, 3/4 of an acre once I take out the shed and yard. I am happy to expand some more and corn will go in here next spring. I wish I could expand faster but until I can find a working business partner I will just have to do what I can.
I have had a couple of bites but no-one who is interested enough to actually come and chat and see the business. It is hard to find anyone who wants to move to a small town like Casterton, even though the business has so much potential.

 Today I got to pulling the white beetroot to select the best roots to replant for seed. I was happy to see that I had to do very little roguing, just about all the roots were a good shape and size.

I sometimes see white beetroot and sugar beet called the same thing in seed catalogues but they are different. White beets are rounder and less sweet that sugar beet, and less ugly.


White beets are said to have none of the chemical that makes red beets taste like dirt to some people. I love beetroot so I don't know for sure but I should test that out one day.














Here is a pic in the middle of planting the selected roots into a new 20m bed. They will quickly recover and be healthy plants by spring when they will bolt to seed.

Today was very cold and frosty in the morning but lovely and sunny this afternoon so I took advantage of the sun to get out and get a heap of work done.