Saturday, May 27, 2017

Disappointing arracacha, and digging the oca

With the weather unusually wet - we have had a wetter autumn than I have experienced for many years - I decided to dig the tuberous vegetables early so I don't risk them rotting in the ground. There have been some disappointments and hope.

The arracacha plants have grown huge and I was really looking forward to eating them this year. Unfortunately when I dug them I found that they had not made any roots. It seems weird to me as I would have thought they needed large roots to support the nutritional needs of all that foliage.

This is the first time I have grown them in the seed block so I guess that it is a nutritional/soil problem that I will have to work out.

At least I will have plenty of divisions to plant out. This is good as I nearly lost all my plants last year in the flooding.




Yesterday it was foggy most of the day and I didn't feel like getting wet while weeding so I decided to dig my oca. They had not died down fully yet so the tubers were not as large as they should be but I was starting to see some slug and mouse damage and I didn't want to take a risk seeing as how I lost nearly all my varieties last year and had a very poor seed germination this season.
I mostly only had the few tubers I saved.

Out of the 33 varieties I planted 9 died of stem rot and I kept 11 of the best producers. I also had 4 that were heat tolerant but only kept the two of those that produced ok.

The summer was pretty mild this year which is probably why more did not get stem rot. Next summer will be the real test.



The four top pictures on the left are of some that I kept. These plants not only produced decent sized tubers (which would have been bigger if I had left them another couple of weeks) but also produced around a kilo of tubers.

I will plant a heap more seed next spring in the hope that I get another nearly black tubered one that I lost last year.











This last pic shows a few tubers of plants that I tossed. These plants mostly produced badly, had small tubers, or did not grow well. I did have one variety that grew into huge bushes but didn't produce many tubers which was sad to toss out, but was a waste of space.





I have left one plant in the ground that is so far showing no sign of frost damage or dying down so I will leave it to see what it does.








Sunday, May 14, 2017

Pulling my potatoes and chufa varieties

It was a lovely day today so I went out and pulled up the last of my TPS diploid potatoes and chufa varieties. We have a had a few frosts now so things are dying down and ready to harvest. The oca won't be long.

The great thing about growing potatoes from true seed is that when you have seed from a range of coloured varieties you never know what you are going to get and just about every plant has different tubers.

I was disappointed to find that I only ended up with one that had red coloured flesh and three that had coloured rings or splashes through the flesh, but what I did dig had a range of white, cream and yellow flesh. They also had a range of tuber sizes and shapes though those in this pic are all small because the plants are the latest and smallest.
 I grabbed some of the small tubers and boiled them to eat while I worked at the computer. Although I like the yellow fleshed waxy ones my taste buds are not sensitive enough to find much of a difference in taste. They were good anyway.


I told you that the rabbits kept eating my peanut plants so I thought I would not get any nuts off them, well, I pulled up a couple of plants and found that I will get enough nuts to plant again next year.

Just in - my young niece is visiting and watching me type this. She asked me to tell you this joke:

What do you call a peanut?
A nut

Well, she will understand a bit more about jokes when she gets older, lol.

I pulled up my 4 varieties of chufa today. I put a few on plates to show you what they look like.

Starting from the left:
*Spanish (productive)
*Black Tiger (the biggest)
*My usual un-named one (the most round)
*Jumbo (didn't live up to its name but it could have been the conditions so I will see next year)

As far as taste is concerned, Spanish was the sweetest, Jumbo the best tasting with a good almond flavour, and the other two were fine but milder.



















Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Selecting Pusa Asita carrot

I am so looking forward to the winter break. The mornings are getting too cold now to be out when the sun rises so I an enjoying sitting at home a bit longer and just working mostly in the afternoon.


I started to harvest the chufa and found that mice have been living among the roots and eating them. I have only been able to gather half of what I expected.
 I was so worried about rabbits that I didn't even consider the mouse problem.

At least the longer than usual season means that the tubers are also bigger. I have enough to sell and some left over to eat, yam.

Today I dug up one small bed of 'Pusa Asita' carrot to choose the best roots to replant for seed.

If you have been following my journey with this carrot you will know that at first I had so much trouble germinating it that I crossed it with 'Cosmic Purple' just to get the germination percentage up.

The germination is a lot better now but I have spent the last couple of seasons selecting back to dark purple/black to the core. Cosmic purple has a yellow core.

The colour seems to be getting a lot better. I dug up 75 carrots and only had to bin three for yellow or white cores and five for having a thin yellow ring around the core.
Hopefully I won't have any light cores at all next season.

 I am also selecting for purple foliage and pink flowers.

Too bad the dark purple flesh stains everything from your hands to the benchtop. At least the dark purple pigment is full of nutritional flavonoids. At least the flavour is good and it doesn't loose its colour too easily when cooking.

 The worst thing about this variety is that it is so damn sensitive to soil conditions. It is usually a fine shape till it matures and then if the soil conditions are not exactly right the roots get so ugly it is hard to even look at them.
Some of these roots got eaten tonight, they are still tender even like this.

I understand it is an environmental problem but I don't want to have to worry about fixing the soil especially for them so I am selecting away from this trait. I want them to do well in any soil.
Only the best coloured single roots go back in the ground. Out of this lot I have selected 36 to replant.

I have another bed that is younger so I won't be digging them till well into winter.





Friday, May 5, 2017

Slowing down for winter

Sorry it has been a while, there is not much happening besides weeding and harvesting the last of the capsicums. Soon I will be digging my chufa but they are still a week or two off.
We had out first light frost this morning which is quite late but I am glad as my oca is only just tuberising now. It is also late which suggests to me that although day length is the main driver for oca tuberising, there is probably something else at play also.


 With a couple of nice days I decided to make new benches for my parents greenhouse. The old, metal benches were so rusted out that they were falling apart.

It is very easy to make benches, all you need is a few treated pine posts, some other timber to hold up the tops and an electric driver and screws. Getting enough boards to make the tops was the hardest thing and I think I might have to buy some to finish off one of the benches.

They don't take long to do so I thought I had better do them now before winter makes it too cold and wet and I will rather stay indoors, lol.

These benches are 7 metres long and one metre wide and after I finish the last of the three I think I will have racked up a bit of good will. My mother is already pleased and has already loaded one of them up with young cyclamens in pots.
I will make another bench underneath to hold empty pots when I get the materials later.


I am really looking forward to going on my annual trip up north to chat with my seed buyers next month. That trip is basically the cut off between work and my three months off.