Thursday, June 13, 2013

Look at my Murnong

I hadn't looked at them for a couple of days and I got a pleasant surprise when I went out and found that a pot of murnong seed was germinating.


Murnong (Microceris lanceolata) is an Australian native plant also called Yam Daisy. The tubers were a staple food for local Aborigines in Southern Australia before European settlement. Unfortunately the sheep and rabbits that the settlers brought with them were very fond of the yam daisy and ate them nearly to extinction.

The tubers are very pleasant when roasted or boiled and I will be growing a lot of them in the future.

I have not grown them before from seed, not only because it is difficult to get seeds, but because I always read that they were difficult to germinate but I believe not that most people either used old seed or tried at the wrong time of the year.
They must be germinated in cool weather such as late autumn or winter.

These seeds came off my own plants that I bought as tubestock last year. Now that I know that they will germinate readily I will put in another couple of pots of them tomorrow.



Here is a picture of my yellow cherry guava. I am not fond of the red ones as they have very hard seeds and have a resinous aftertaste. It won't be long till the fruit is ripe and I will try to grow some seeds.

I love the yellow ones much better for three reasons:
1, they fruit for a longer time of the year
2, the fruits are bigger and much sweeter and tastier
3, The yellow ones have much softer seeds so they are more pleasant to eat.

My one plant is only a metre tall and I am waiting impatiently for a warm spring to get it growing strongly.










2 comments:

  1. Hello Rowan!
    How has been your growing?
    I would like to grow some Yam Daisy too but don't find a lot of information... Do you know how long it can take to harvest the first fruit if I start from seed now?
    Thank you by advance! :)
    Pauline

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    1. I have found that by the time it is a decent plant at around 1 year the roots are big enough to eat.

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